San Juan National Forest

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37.4449,-106.903

This popular campground, 23 miles north of Pagosa Springs, Colorado, offers both shaded and sunny campsites with some located creek-side. Visitors enjoy the area for its fishing, all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riding, and scenic opportunities.

The campground is situated among cedar, aspen and ponderosa pines. Some sites are located on the banks of Williams Creek, which runs along the eastern edge of the campground; some have spectacular views of the surrounding mountains.

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37.44472,-106.90306

West Fork Campground sits near the West Fork San Juan River in a secluded 10-acre area, just over a mile from Highway 160. Visitors enjoy the area for its hiking opportunities and plentiful solitude.

The campground is situated among a forest of mixed conifers, where sites have sun and shade. The West Fork can be heard, but not seen from the campground.

Ute
37.2154,-107.2725

The Ute Campground is 17 miles west of Pagosa Springs on U.S. Highway 160 and campground is on north side of the highway. Ute Campground has 26 campsites on a gentle, south-facing slope. Ponderosa pines give shade, but the area gets very warm in summer. The hillside above the campground offers excellent views of the pinnacles of Chimney Rock Archaeological Area.

37.51,-107.2294

Teal Campground is a mile north of Williams Creek Campground along Forest Rd. 640, overlooking Williams Creek Reservoir. Its 16 sites have views of surrounding peaks. There is some shade, but much of the area is open and grassy. Only a few sites are suitable for larger RVs. Teal is popular, so plan to arrive early on busy summer weekends and holidays.

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37.54639, -107.19667

Palisades Horse Camp is located 30 miles north of Pagosa Springs, high in the San Juan National Forest. This beautiful area has excellent horseback riding and hiking trails and an abundance of wildlife.

The campground is nestled in a stand of pine, spruce and fir trees, and sits at an elevation of 8,300 feet. The area provides panoramic views of the surrounding meadows and mountains. Williams Creek flows nearby.

The surrounding forest provides a prime wildlife habitat. Bears, deer, elk and moose frequent the area.

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37.37417, -106.88667

East Fork Campground is located 11 miles northeast of Pagosa Springs, just off U.S. Highway 160, along the East Fork Road. Visitors enjoy the area for its fishing, hiking and scenic opportunities.

The campground sits on a ridge overlooking the East Fork of the San Juan River. Some sites have views of the river, but it’s a long way down the hill. Short, but steep trails lead down the hill, to the riverbanks. A forest of ponderosa pine and gambel oak trees shades the campground. At 7,700 feet, temperatures can be a bit warmer than at surrounding campgrounds.

37.5389,-107.21

Cimarrona Campground is 2.3 miles north of Teal Campground on Forest Rd. 640, above the reservoir and near the end of the road. The campground has 21 sites; a few can handle large-sized RVs. There are sunny and shady sites; a couple are well shaded. The campground is next to Cimarrona Creek, with views of the meadow and reservoir to the south. It’s only a short walk to fish in the creek. The campground is adjacent to the Cimarrona Trailhead.

37.4655,-107.1975

Bridge Campground, 19 miles from Pagosa Springs, is northwest of US Highway 160 on the Piedra Road (County Road 600, which turns into Forest Rd. 631). It offers 19 sites in a flat, open area. Large sites offer views of the high peaks to the north. The campground is moderately used, and sites are usually available.

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37.14528,-106.88306

Blanco River Group Campground is located four miles off U.S. Highway 84, on Forest Road 656. It is about 15 miles southeast of Pagosa Springs, on the Blanco River. The campground is a convenient stopping point between the towns of Chama, N.M., and Pagosa Springs, Colo. Secluded and quiet, the campgound is an ideal place for family and friends to gather.

The campground is situated on the banks of the Blanco River, surrounded by ponderosa pine and cottonwoods. The trees offer shade, but the area is quite warm during the summer months. The riparian environment is fairly level with a few adjacent grassy meadows.

37.2429,-107.343

The Lower Piedra Campground is just north of U.S. Highway 160 on the west side of the Piedra River, about 18 miles east of Bayfield and 25 miles west of Pagosa Springs. It is about a half mile up Forest Rd. 621 on the west side of the river (not to be confused with the First Fork Road [Forest Rd. 622] on the east side of the river). The campground offers 17 large, level sites with plenty of shade. Fishing opportunities are available.

NOTICE: Dispersed camping is not allowed within 100 yards of either side of Forest Road 621 leading to the Lower Piedra Campground (from the cattle guard to the camp-ground boundary).

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37.4775, -107.54667

Vallecito Campground is a very popular site and one of the largest within the San Juan National Forest. It sits on Vallecito Creek, adjacent to the Weminuche Wilderness. Visitors enjoy the area for its trail and fishing opportunities, which are part of a very scenic, natural setting.

Vallecito, which is Spanish for “little valley,” sits at an elevation of 8,000 feet, high in the beautiful San Juan Mountains. A forest of ponderosa pine, aspen and gambel oak trees covers the campground. Most sites are large and fairly level.

Rocky Mountain Recreation Company also operates AIS Boat Inspections at this reservoir as well.  Please click here for a link to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife website with more information on AIS inspections.

37.4624,-107.6809

Transfer Park Campground is only 1 mile past Florida Campground, with 11 acres of shaded settings above the Florida River. This was the site of a historic transfer station for ore and supplies between pack mules and wagons in the mining era. Two loops have 25 sites with shade and sun, and large, open play areas. The upper loop is mostly level, with several larger sites. The lower loop is near the river and has 2 larger sites, a few short pull-thru’s, and several tent spots.Parking for the Burnt Timber Trail is near the camp-ground. Hitching rails and an unloading dock for horses are available; however, horses are not allowed in the campground. This popular trail accesses the Weminuche Wilderness (where mountain bicycles and motorized vehicles are prohibited), with connections to the Lime Mesa, Mountain View Crest, and City Reservoir areas.

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37.8056,-107.7751

Campgrounds still open between September and May have no services (water, electric, trash pick up or rest rooms). Please keep them clean and pack it out. Thanks!

South Mineral Campground is accessed by turning off U.S. Highway 550, about 3 miles west of Silverton, onto Forest Rd. 585, which heads west along South Mineral Creek. The campground is 4 miles off the highway and has 26 mostly level sites. Several camping loops and well-spaced sites are mostly shaded, but some are sunny. A few are next to the creek, and some have large parking areas. The Ice Lake Basin Trail, a strenuous, steep, and popular hike, begins across the road from the campground. It leads up above timberline to high alpine lakes surrounded by meadows of wildflowers and rocky peaks. Please stay on the trail to avoid steep, dangerous dropoffs. Dispersed camping along Forest Rd. 585 is allowed only in designated camping areas. Follow posted directions and instructions. The road to the campground is drivable by 2WD, but not far after the campground, it becomes 4WD. Driving off- road is prohibited, but many other 4WD roads in the Silverton area are open to motorized use.

37.3633,-108.0795

Campgrounds still open between September and May have no services (water, electric, trash pick up or rest rooms). Please keep them clean and pack it out. Thanks!

Snowslide Campground is 6 miles up the canyon from U.S. Highway 160 and adjacent to the LaPlata River with entrances on both sides of the road. Its 13 sites are well shaded. The maximum RV size is 35 feet. There is no potable water, but you can get water from Kroeger Campground. There is no trash pickup; trash must be packed out.

37.6335,-107.8838

Sig Creek Campground, 32 miles north of Durango, has 9 campsites on a southfacing hillside about 1/4 mile from the East Fork of Hermosa Creek. The campground is 6 miles west of Durango Mountain Resort on the Hermosa Park Rd. (Forest Rd. 578), accessible by 2WD. Much of this gravel road follows the route of the Scotch Creek Toll Road, which ran from Rico to the Animas Valley in the late 1800s. The road continues over Bolam Pass to Colorado Highway 145 north of Rico. The upper section is 4WD only.The upper trailhead for the Hermosa Creek Trail begins 2 miles past the campground, near the confluence of the main and east forks of Hermosa Creek. This multiple-use trail heads back to the town of Hermosa through the Hermosa Roadless Area. The trail offers a technical single-track experience for mountain bikes (at 19 miles, taking most of a day, including shuttle drops). A few camping sites are available at the trailhead, which has a toilet, picnic tables, fire grates, corral, and parking area.

37.4471,-107.5049

Campgrounds still open between September and May have no services (water, electric, trash pick up or rest rooms). Please keep them clean and pack it out. Thanks!

Four miles beyond Middle Mountain Campground, at the end of Forest Rd. 602, is the Pine River Campground, at the Pine River Trailhead. This primitive campground has a parking area with hitching posts and a turn-around parking area for trailers, but no corral. There is no potable water. All 6 campsites have views up the Pine River Valley. Private land is adjacent, with no public access to the river until three miles up the trail. Campsites accommodate only tents or small RVs. The Pine River Trail crosses private land for 3 miles before reaching the Weminuche Wilderness. Respect private property, and leave gates as you find them. The trail is very popular with horseback riders and follows the Pine River for 6 miles to intersect with the Lake Creek Trail, which leads steeply uphill to Emerald Lake. Mountain bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed in the Wilderness Area.

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37.40028, -107.535

Pine Point Campground is situated next to Vallecito Reservoir in southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its beautiful scenery and wide range of recreational activities, including boating, fishing and hiking.

The Vallecito lake, which is Spanish for “little valley,” sits at an elevation of 7,900 feet. A scenic forest of ponderosa pine covers the campground, which offers many shaded, lakefront sites with easy access to the shore. High peaks of the San Juan Mountains are visible to the northwest of the campground.

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37.39389, -107.53889

North Canyon Campground is situated next to Vallecito Reservoir in southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its beautiful scenery and wide range of recreational activities, including boating, fishing and hiking.

Vallecito, which is Spanish for “little valley,” sits at an elevation of 7,900 feet. Scattered ponderosa pines tower over the open campground, offering limited shade. A thick understory provides privacy between sites, many of which have partial lake views. Thickets of willow separate the camping area from the lakeshore. High peaks of the San Juans are visible to the northwest of the campground.

37.4046,-107.6612

Campgrounds still open between September and May have no services (water, electric, trash pick up or rest rooms). Please keep them clean and pack it out. Thanks!

Miller Creek Campground is about 18 miles north of Durango and 2 miles north of the Lemon Reservoir dam along Forest Rd. 596 (County Rd. 243).

The campground has a concrete boat ramp at its north end. Its 12 campsites offer a choice of sun or shade; 5 of the sites share a large parking area. RVs can be leveled without much difficulty. A shady roadside picnic area has 4 tables available for day use. The Upper Lemon Day-Use Area, a fishing-access site, is 1.5 miles north of Miller Creek.

MiddleMountain.jpg
37.4089,-107.536

Following County Road 501 around the north end of the lake, then south for about three miles will take you to Middle Mountain Campground, which has 24 sites with southern exposure and easy access to the water. Some shade is provided by ponderosa pines and small aspen. A few sites accommodate large RVs.The Middle Mountain Road (Forest Rd. 724) leads to the old mining town of Tuckerville and into the Weminuche Wilderness where bicycles and motor vehicles are not allowed.

37.3762,-108.0771

Kroeger Campground is located in La Plata Canyon, with 10 campsites on 2 shaded acres. You can fish in the nearby La Plata River, but success rates are only fair. Expect cool summer nights at this elevation. There is no trash pickup; trash must be packed out. Most sites do not accommodate larger RVs. Private property is adjacent to the campground – do not trespass.

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37.33611, -107.915

Junction Creek Campground is located close to Durango, Colo., near the beginning of the Colorado Trail. Visitors enjoy the area for its excellent hiking and biking opportunities in a scenic natural setting.

The campground is situated on a south-facing hillside, a quarter-mile above Junction Creek. A forest of ponderosa pine and gambel oak covers the campground, which sits at an elevation of 7,300 feet.

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37.53472, -107.80583

Haviland Lake Campground is situated on its beautiful namesake within the San Juan National Forest, 18 miles north of Durango. Visitors enjoy the area for its canoeing, fishing and hiking opportunities in a scenic, natural setting. The popular campground is beautiful any time of the year.

The campground is situated on the shore of Haviland Lake, among shady, towering ponderosa pines, at an elevation of 8,705 feet. Many sites have lake views and easy shoreline access. Campers are awarded spectacular views of the Hermosa Cliffs across the lake.

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37.39028, -107.54

Graham Creek Campground is situated above Vallecito Lake, in the scenic San Juan National Forest of southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its beautiful scenery and wide range of recreational activities, including boating, fishing and hiking.

Vallecito Lake, Spanish for “little valley,” sits at an elevation of 7,900 feet. Scattered ponderosa pine trees tower over the open campground, offering limited shade. Hillside sites are about 100 yards from the high-water line and offer nice lake views.

A thick understory provides privacy between sites. Thickets of willow separate the camping area from the lakeshore. Several short trails lead to the lake from the campground. High peaks of the San Juans are visible to the northwest of the campground.

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37.45, -107.66639

Florida Campground is located near the north end of Lemon Reservoir, in southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its fishing, trail opportunities and scenic natural setting.

This lightly used campground is situated in a shady forest of Colorado blue spruce, Douglas fir and aspen trees. The swift Florida River flows next to the campground.

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37.51639, -107.8

Chris Park is located near Haviland Lake in southwestern Colorado, 18 miles north of Durango. Visitors enjoy the area for its hiking, canoeing and fishing opportunities.

The campground is situated in a mostly flat, open area, shaded by scattered ponderosa pine trees. Haviland Lake is a short drive from the site.

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37.46722, -108.21

Transfer Campground, located approximately 11 miles north of Mancos, Colorado in the San Juan National Forest, is known for its access to many area recreation trails.

The campground is situated at an elevation of 8,500 feet. Surrounded by whispering aspen and making for a great camping atmosphere, visitors will enjoy the sounds of birds and the occasional horse neighing in the corrals across the road.

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37.56833, -108.30222

Target Tree Campground is located 7 miles east of Mancos on the north side of Highway 160 at an elevation of 7,643 feet. It is the ideal camping spot for day trips to Mancos, Durango and Mesa Verde National Park.

The name, “Target Tree,” refers to the Ute Indians’ use of the area to harvest sap and bark from Ponderosa pines as food supplements. They also used the trees for target practice, leaving several scarred trees throughout the area.

The campground sits on a south-facing hillside overlooking Thompson Park. A Ponderosa pine and Gambel oak forest provides shade in many sites. The area is hot during the summer, but cools off significantly at night.

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37.65972, -108.27611

West Dolores Campground is located on the West Dolores Road (Forest Road 535), which branches north from Colorado Highway 145 about 20 miles northeast of Dolores. It is a great place to relax and enjoy the outdoors by hiking, biking and fishing.

The campground is situated on the banks of the West Dolores River, which has its headwaters in the nearby Lizard Head Wilderness. A shady forest of spruce, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir covers the campground. The campground is at an elevation of 7,800 feet.

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37.5, -108.55

McPhee Recreation Complex is located on the south shore of McPhee Reservoir near the town of Dolores in southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its boating, water skiing and fishing opportunities.

The campground is situated on a mesa 500 feet above the reservoir, at an elevation of 7,400 feet. Pinyon and juniper trees offer shade throughout the campground.

Rocky Mountain Recreation Company also operates AIS Boat Inspections at this reservoir as well.  Please click here for a link to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife website with more information on AIS inspections.

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37.65111, -108.29694

Mavreeso Campground is located on the West Dolores Road (Forest Road 535), which branches north from Colorado Highway 145 about 20 miles northeast of Dolores. It is a great place to relax and enjoy the outdoors by hiking, biking and fishing.

The campground stretches along the banks of the West Dolores River, which has its headwaters in the nearby Lizard Head Wilderness. A shady forest of spruce, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir covers the campground. It is situated at an elevation of 7,600 feet.

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37.52028, -108.53056

House Creek Campground is located on the shores of McPhee Reservoir near the town of Dolores in southwestern Colorado. Visitors enjoy the area for its boating, water skiing and fishing opportunities.

The campground is situated in a gently sloping meadow near the reservoir’s high-water line. The is no shade and the area is hot during summer.

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37.787,-108.0677

Campgrounds still open between September and May have no services (water, electric, trash pick up or rest rooms). Please keep them clean and pack it out. Thanks!

Two miles northeast of Dunton, Burro Bridge is one of three campgrounds along the West Dolores Road (Forest Rd. 535), which branches north from Colorado Highway 145 about 13 miles northeast of Dolores. The campground has 14 sites above the West Dolores River with horse corrals and easy acces to the Lizard Head Wilderness, but not easy access to the water.  The road follows the West Dolores River almost to its headwaters in the Lizard Head Wilderness. Side roads lead into the backcountry. After 32 miles, the road rejoins the highway 6 miles north of Rico. The road has a gravel surface, but the last 6 miles are steep, narrow, and not recommended for trailers.

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37.77139, -107.97722
970-882-7296970-882-7296

Cayton Campground is 6 miles northeast of Rico on Colorado Highway 145 (part of the San Juan Skyway) 43 miles from Dolores. The entrance is 1/2 mile east of the highway on the Barlow Creek Road (Forest Rd. 578). The campground has 27 campsites, many along the river. Eighteen sites offer 50 amp RV electric plug ins. Fishing is popular on summer weekends. At 9,400 feet, expect cool evenings. A dry dump station is in place.

The Barlow Creek Road continues past the campground and crosses Bolam Pass with spectacular views. Road conditions near the pass often limit travel to 4WD vehicles. The route eventually connects with the Hermosa Park Road behind Durango Mountain Resort and leads to U.S. Highway 550. The Colorado Trail follows the ridge across Bolam Pass.

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